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SuperMe

„SuperMe is a web game which helps you to be better at life. It’s about resilience: how to feel good when life chucks you lemons. How to be better at thinking positively. How to cope with, and learn to love, failure. By playing SuperMe you’ll learn how to be more resilient in real life, and by playing every piece of content you’ll score points. Points! Everyone wants those.

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Funny t-shirt: "this was supposed to be the future"

This t-shirt design by John Slabyk over at Threadless should be part of any credentialed Futurist’s wardrobe:

they lied to us this was supposed to be the future where is my jetpack, where is my robotic companion, where is my dinner in pill form, where is my hydrogen fueled automobile, where is my nuclear-powered levitating home, where is my cure for this disease „Damn Scientist“ t-shirt (Thanks, Emily Goligoski!)

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Kate MacDowell

Stunning handmade porcelain scupltures by Kate MacDowell… (via Reluct)

Casualty “In my work this romantic ideal of union with the natural world conflicts with our contemporary impact on the environment.  These pieces are in part responses to environmental stressors including climate change, toxic pollution, and ogm crops.  They also borrow from myth, art history, figures of speech and other cultural touchstones  (…)  In each case the union between man and nature is shown to be one of …

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First self-replicating mathematical creature

The Game of Life is a cellular automation first devised in 1970 by mathematician John Conway. It’s played by setting simple rules and then watching how the cells live, die, interact, and form complex patterns that evolve over time. Last month, Canadian computer programmer Andrew Wade managed to spur the emergence of the game’s very first self-replicating mathematical creature. It’s named Gemini. From New Scientist: Gemini’s implications extend to the real world. „There’s a fascination with the …

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Five Essential Books on Video Games [The New Yorker]

“Video games matured at a time when the traditional outlets that would have tracked its growth were in sharp decline. As a result, much of the good writing lives on the web, which has served as a wonderful incubator for young writers hashing out their experiences. Video games are still a bit of blue ocean in the world of non-fiction, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few titles worth recommending.”

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Video games and its influence on the military industry

„In The Disruptive Potential of Game Technologies: Lessons Learned from its Impact on the Military Simulation Industry, Roger Smith discusses how computer games have a disruptive impact on military industry and suggest that these will disrupt other industries in the future.

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War

Home | OpenCalais

“The OpenCalais Web Service automatically creates rich semantic metadata for the content you submit – in well under a second. Using natural language processing (NLP), machine learning and other methods, Calais analyzes your document and finds the entities within it. But, Calais goes well beyond classic entity identification and returns the facts and events hidden within your text as well.

The tags are delivered to you; you can then incorporate them into other applications - for search, news aggregation, blogs, catalogs, you name it.”

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XML

AI, Game AI and apparent intelligences | Think Artificial

“But regarding Game AI in general: modern games are horribly void of intelligence. It depends on where you set the bar, certainly. There’s tons of AI in modern games compared to 5 years ago. But the first thing to note is that Game AI is not the same as AI. It’s a subset of it. Just like discrete mathematics are a subset of mathematics. And moreover, Game AI is a very specialized subset—it has well defined goals, models for construction and limitations.”

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Ai

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